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Florida Condo & HOA Legal Blog News & Updates on Condo & HOA Laws & Legislation in the State of Florida

Florida Condominium and HOA Fining Laws are Slightly Different

Posted in Covenant Enforcement/Violations, Legislation, Suspensions, Fines & Remedies, Uncategorized

Row of brightly painted housesQuestion: There seems to have been a lot of change in the law about fining. Has the legislature finally made the condominium statute and the homeowners’ association statute the same on this issue? (C.M. by e-Mail)

Answer: More or less. The legislature is getting closer to making the statutes identical, but there are still a few minor differences. For an overview of the fining (and suspension process), see my column dated September 15, 2016, titled “Association Has Several Options to Enforce HOA Documents.

The first difference is who may serve on the independent committee. The condominium law only allows unit owners to be committee members. Those unit owners cannot be on the board or live with a board member. There is no ownership requirement found in the homeowners’ association statute, although the bylaws would still have some role on the composition of committees. The only restriction in the HOA law is that committee members may not be officers, directors, or employees of the association, or the spouse, parent, child, brother or sister of an officer, director, or employee.

There is also a difference between the two laws regarding the required number of committee members. The Homeowners’ Association Act states that there must be a minimum of three members on the committee, but the Condominium Act is silent. The Florida Not for Profit Corporation Act provides that a committee must have at least two members.

The statutes differ materially regarding the amount of a fine that can be imposed. The Condominium Act provides that no fine may be more than $100.00 per day and the total fine may not exceed an aggregate of $1000.00. The Homeowners’ Association Act contains similar limits, but also allows both a higher daily and aggregate amount if established in the association’s governing documents.

Homeowners’ associations provide that fines of $1000.00 or more may become a lien on the property. The Condominium Act prohibits fines from being secured by a lien.